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Toubkal National Park Treks - High Atlas Mountains !

Morocco Desert Discovery Tours ! Erg Chebbi Merzouga or Chegaga Dunes

Morocco Mountain Biking - Single Track or Off-Road Trips !

Day Trips From Marrakech ! Excursions from Marrakech

Imperial Cities Tours Via Sahara Desert ! Starting from Casablanca or Marrakech

Berber Villages and High Atlas Valleys Treks ! Culture Treks

Full Days Hiking in the Atlas Mountains ! Challenge Day Hiking or Half Day Trek from Marrakech

Morocco Information !

Morocco officially the Kingdom of Morocco is a country located in North Africa. It has a population of over 32 million and an area of 446,550 km² (710,850 km² with Western Sahara). & it is as well an ideal destination for adventure travel and holidays

The best landscapes, beautiful valleys, high summits, large deserts, famous cities and great beaches, wealth of quiet tracks, charming people, beautiful scenery and famous pubs have made Morocco a leading destination for outdoor enthusiasts. As the foremost supplier of walking tours in the country, we continue to show the best of undiscovered Morocco at affordable prices. We take care of all accommodation, organize your hike along way marked ways with all your route details.


Regions

  • Mediterranean Morocco
  • Hosts all sorts of towns and cities, a couple Spanish enclaves and some important ports
  • North Atlantic Coast
  • The northern half of Morocco's coast is home to the capital and Casablanca, interspersed with more laid back beach towns
  • South Atlantic Coast
  • The southern coast is more laidback, home to gorgeous beach towns like Essaouira and Agadir
  • High Atlas
  • Covering the High Atlas mountains and the surrounding areas including Marrakech
  • Middle Atlas
  • covering the Middle Atlas mountains and the surrounding areas including Fez and Meknes
  • Saharan Morocco
  • The vast desert region of Morocco runs along the border with Algeria; camel safaris and sand dunes are the name of the game here
  • Anti Atlas
  • The southern portion, covering Tarouddant down to the Western Sahara border.
  • Cities

Cities

  • Rabat – The capital of Morocco; very relaxed and hassle-free, highlights include a 12th-century tower and minaret.
  • Casablanca – This modern city by the sea is a starting point for visitors flying into the country. If you have the time, both the historical medina and the contemporary mosque (the second largest in the world) are well worth an afternoon
  • Fez – Fez is the former capital of Morocco and one of the oldest and largest medieval cities in the world.
  • Marrakech – Marrakech is a perfect combination of old and new Morocco. Plan to spend at least a few days wandering the huge maze of souks and ruins in the medina. The great plaza of Djeema El Fna at dusk is not to be missed.
  • Meknes – A modern, laid back city that offers a welcome break from the tourist crush of neighbouring Fez.
  • Ouarzazate – Considered the Capital of the South, Ouarzazate is a great example of preservation and tourism that hasn't destroyed the feel of a fantastic and ancient city.
  • Tangier –Tangier is the starting point for most visitors arriving by ferry from Spain. An enigmatic charm which has historically attracted numerous artists (Matisse), musicians (Hendrix), politicians (Churchill), writers (Burroughs) and others (Malcolm Forbes).
  • Taroudannt – A southern market town.
  • Tetouan – Nice beaches and is the gateway to the Rif Mountains.

Other destinations

  • Agadir – Agadir is best-known for its beaches. The town is a nice example of modern Morocco, with less emphasis on history and culture. Take the local bus for a few cents and go 2 or 3 villages North, where there are additional beaches
  • Amizmiz – With one of the largest Berber souks in the High Atlas Mountains every Tuesday, Amizmiz is a popular destination for travelers looking for a day trip that is easily accessible (about an hour) from Marrakech
  • Chefchaouen – A mountain town just inland from Tangier full of white-washed winding alleys, blue doors, and olive trees, Chefchaouen is clean as a postcard and a welcome escape from Tangier, evoking the feeling of a Greek island
  • Essaouira – An ancient sea-side town newly rediscovered by tourists. From mid-June to August the beaches are packed but any other time and you'll be the only person there. Good music and great people. Nearest Coast from Marrakech
  • Merzouga and M'Hamid – From either of these two settlements at the edge of the Sahara, ride a camel or 4x4 into the desert for a night (or a week) among the dunes and under the stars
  • Tinerhir – This town is the perfect point of access to the stunning Todra Gorge

By plane:

There are flights from New York, Montreal, and various European cities to Casablanca as well as seasonal charter flights to Agadir.

Easyjet — now fly at budget prices from London to Marrakech.

British Airways — also offer promotional fares.

Ryanair — has signed an agreement with the Moroccan government and flies to Morocco from Girona, Frankfurt-Hahn and London. Flying to Fez 3 times per week.

Royal Air Maroc — the state airline, which drastically needs a price cut.

Atlas Blue — a so-called budget airline owned by Royal Air Maroc, but is still fairly expensive.

Jet 4 You — a new low-cost carrier with extremely cheap tickets from France and Belgium.

Aigle Azur — a small North-African carrier with reasonable rates.

Thomson fly — Fly from Manchester to Marrakech and are very reasonably priced.

Many visitors also fly to Gibraltar or Malaga (which are often considerably cheaper to get to) and take a ferry from Algeciras, Tarifa or Gibraltar to Tangier. This is not recommended in summer as literally millions of Moroccans living in Europe use this passage during the summer holidays.

Talk

Moroccan Arabic is a dialect of Maghreb Arabic. The language is fairly different from the Arabic traditionally spoken in the Middle East and is also slightly influenced by French or Spanish, depending on where in the country you are. This dialect is also related to Spanish, as Spanish was heavily influenced by Arabic from Morocco before the expulsion of 1492.

Berber, or the Amazigh language, is spoken by Morocco's Berber population. In the mountainous regions of the north the dialect is Tarifit, the central region the dialect is Tamazight, and in the south of the country the dialect is Tachelheet.

French is still widely understood in Morocco, and it is the most useful non-Arabic language to know.
Although you will find people who speak English and Spanish in tourist centers, many of these will be touts and faux guides, who may become a burden. Some shop owners and hotel managers in urban centers also speak English, but outside of that English is not widely understood.


Eat:

Moroccan cuisine is often reputed to be some of the best in the world, with countless dishes and variations proudly bearing the country's colonial and Arabic influences. Unfortunately as a tourist through Morocco, especially if you're on a budget, you'll be limited to the handful of dishes that seem to have a monopoly on cafe and restaurant menus throughout the country. Apart from major cities, Morocans do not generally eat out in restaurants so choice is generally limited to international fare such as Chinese, Indian and French cuisine.
Traditional cuisine:

Couscous made from semolina grains and steamed in a colander-like dish known as a couscoussière is the staple food for most Moroccans, and is probably the best known Moroccan meal. It can be served as an accompaniment to a stew or tagine, or mixed with meat and vegetables and presented as a main course.

Tagine, a spicy stew of meat and vegetables that has been simmered for many hours in a conical clay pot (from which the dish derives its name). Restaurants offer dozens of variations (from Dh 25 in budget restaurant) including chicken tagine with lemon and olives and prawn tagine in a spicy tomato sauce.

A popular Berber contribution to Moroccan cuisine is kaliya, a combination of lamb, tomatoes, bell peppers and onion and served with couscous or bread.

A popular delicacy in Morocco is Pastilla, made by layering thin pieces of flakey dough between sweet, spiced meat filling (often lamb or chicken, but most enjoyably pigeon) and layers of almond-paste filling. The dough is wrapped into a plate-sized pastry that is baked and coated with a dusting of powdered sugar.

Moroccans often elect to begin their meals with warming bowl of harira (French: soupe moroccaine), a delicious soup made from lentils, chick peas, lamb stock, tomatoes and vegetables. Surprisingly, among Moroccans harira has a role of nourishing food for "blue-collars" rather than a high-flying cuisine.

Soups are also traditional breakfasts in Morocco. Bissara, a thick glop made from split peas and a generous wallop of olive oil can be found bubbling away near markets and in medinas in the mornings.

Many cafes (see Drink) and restaurants also offer good value petit déjeuner breakfast deals, which basically include a tea or coffee, orange juice (jus d'Orange) and a croissant or bread with marmalade from Dh 10.
Snacks and fast food

Snackers and budget watchers are well catered for in Morocco. Rotisserie chicken shops abound, where you can get a quarter chicken served with fries and salad, served from rotisserie chicken shops or hole-in-the-wall establishments are also popular. These fresh crusty baguettes are stuffed with any number of fillings including tuna, chicken, brochettes and a variety of salads. This is all usually topped off with the obligatory wad of French fries stuffed into the sandwich and lashings of mayonnaise squeezed on top.

You may also see hawkers and vendors selling a variety of nuts, as well as steamed broad beans and BBQ'd corn cobs.
Drink

As a predominantly Muslim country, Morocco is mostly dry. Alcohol is available only in restaurants, bars, supermarkets, hotels and discos. Some Moroccans enjoy a drink although it is disapproved in public places. The local brew of choice carries the highly original name of Casablanca Beer. It is a full flavoured lager and enjoyable with the local cuisine or as a refreshment.

As a rule, do not drink tap water at all in Morocco, even in hotels, as it contains much higher levels of minerals than the water in Europe. For local people this is not a problem as their bodies are used to this and can cope, but for travellers from places such as Europe drinking the tap water will usually result in illness. Generally this is not serious, an upset stomach being the only symptom, but it is enough to spoil a day or two of your holiday.

Bottled water is widely available. Popular brands of water include Oulmes (sparkling) and Sidi Ali, Sidi Harazem and Ain Saiss DANONE (still). The latter has a slightly mineral and metallic taste. Nothing with a high mineralization produced (so far?).

Any traveller will be offered mint tea at least once a day. Even the most financially modest Moroccan is equipped with a tea pot and a few glasses. Although sometimes the offer is more of a lure into a shop than a hospitable gesture it is polite to accept. Before drinking look the host in the eye and say 'bi saha raha'. It means enjoy and relax and any local will be impressed with your language skills.

Note that a solo woman may feel more comfortable having a drink or snack at a pastry shop or restaurant as cafes are traditionally for men. This doesn't apply to couples, of course.
Sleep

What to wear:

You won't need high and heavy mountain boots unless you go in coldest time of the year like February: it's quite warm in the country even when it's heavy raining in November. Even in medinas, streets are paved if not asphalted--just be sure your footwear is not toeless in medina, as it may be dirty or unsanitary.

For trekking in valleys, low trekking shoes will be likely enough.

For a desert trip to dunes, ensure your pockets can be easily shaken out as sand gets in there very quickly.

Geology

  • The Anti Atlas and Saharian domain comprised of gently deformed Paleozoic sealed to the Northwest African Craton during the Hercynian orogeny.
  • The Mesetian domain characterized by deformed Paleozoic unconformably overlain by gently folded Meso-Cenosoic deposits.
  • The Atlasic domain corresponding to the inversion of the Atlasic through which was filled by thick Mesozoic sediments.
  • The Atlantic passive margin consisting of thick Mesozoic sediments locally deformed by salt tectonics and gravity induced imbrications with important turbidite sheet deposits basinwards.
  • The Rif domain a thrust fold belt where the deformation of the Meso-Cenozoic series decreases southward

The geography of Morocco spans from the Atlantic Ocean, to mountainous areas, to the Sahara (desert). Morocco is a Northern African country, bordering the North Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea.

A large part of Morocco is mountainous. The Atlas Mountains are located mainly in the center and the south of the country. The Rif Mountains are located in the north of the country. Both ranges are mainly inhabited by the Berber people.

Geography statistics Coordinates: 32°00′N 5°00′W

Climate & when to go

Morocco is at its best in spring (mid-March to May), when the country is lush and green, followed by autumn (September to November), when the heat of summer has eased. At other times, don’t underestimate the extremes of summer heat and winter, particularly in the High Atlas, where snowcapped peaks persist from November to July. If you are travelling in winter, head for the south, although be prepared for bitterly cold nights. The north coast and the Rif Mountains are frequently wet and cloudy in winter and early spring.

Apart from the weather, the timing of Ramadan (the traditional Muslim month of fasting and purification) is another important consideration as some restaurants and cafés close during the day and general business hours are reduced.

 

 

 

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